Another no heat, quick lotion/moisturiser using cold process technology

Cold process emulsifiers are becoming popular as manufacturers search for ways of reducing costs and greener production methods.  The conventional way of forming a emulsion is to heat the two phases separately then bring them together with mixing.  It takes a lot of time and energy to heat the ingredients to 70°C and hold them there for 20 minutes.

Following my previous post on the cold emulsifier, Sucragel –http://makingskincare.com/2013/11/20/quick-no-heat-lotion/ I decided, to try another cold emulsifier, Durosoft from Stephenson Personal Care which is a range of polyglycerol esters produced from vegetable oils and glycerin – http://www.stephensonpersonalcare.com/products/durosoft/.  The Durosoft range can serve as emulsifiers (o/w, w/o and co-emulsifiers) and solubilizer. They are both water and oil soluble and cold processable and PEG free.

The chemist at Stephenson, kindly sent me a sample of one of the range – Durosoft PK (INCI: Elaeis Guineensis (Palm Kernel) Oil Polyglycerol-4 Esters) and provided formulation tips.   (If you would like to try the emulsifier, the sales contact is james.clews@stephensongroup.co.uk).

The formula below produces a gel-type lotion / moisturiser (due to the sodium polyacrylate) which spreads well and sinks in easily.  I found Durosoft easy to work with, particularly compared to Sucragel.

I would not advise using silicone with Durosoft, however, it is fine with electrolytes.  The sodium polyacrylate I have included in the formula however, is sensitive to electrolytes so do not include ingredients such as protein, aloe vera, sodium lactate, green tea etc.

As we are not heating and holding our emulsion, don’t forget to pre-boil the water beforehand (to kill some of the non-endospore-forming bacteria), let it cool then use immediately.  The preservative should be used at the supplier’s recommended level (0.5% in the case of liquid germall plus) and, as always, do test preservative efficacy with new formulations.

FORMULA – use this recipe calculator to convert the % below into grams – http://makingskincare.com/recipe-calculator/

PHASE A– water soluble ingredients
76.7% deionized/distilled/purified water (pre-boiled and cooled).
3% glycerin
0.5% liquid germall plus (for alternative preservatives see – http://makingskincare.com/preservatives/)
1.5% Durosoft PK

PHASE B – oil soluble ingredients (the gum+sodium polyacrylate are water soluble but putting them here helps wetting and reduces clumping)
0.3% xanthan gum
15% vegetable oils
1.5% Durosoft PK
0.4% sodium polyacrylate (to thicken, stabilise)
0.1% vitamin E
1% fragrance/essential oil

polyglycerol-illustrator-1

polyglycerol-illustrator-2

  • Pre-boil the deionized/distilled/purified water and allow to cool (this is to kill some of the non-endospore-forming bacteria).
  • Put Phase A (water phase) contents into a container, mix until homogeneous.
  • Put Phase B ingredients into a separate container, mix and then add to the Phase A (water phase).
  • Stick blend until homogeneous.
  • Done!

13 replies
    • Making Skincare
      Making Skincare says:

      Anything which is solid at room temperature will need heating in order to melt so this cold process method would then become hot process. You would need to heat both the oils and the water so it is above the melting point of the shea butter and then combine.

      Reply
      • ann
        ann says:

        And when you say heat both oils do you mean oils (phase b) and water (phase A )? So would the shea butter be in phase b and be at 15% where the vegetable oil is

        Reply
      • ann
        ann says:

        And when you say heat both oils do you mean oils (phase b) and water (phase A )? So would the shea butter be in phase b and be at 15% where the vegetable oil is. Please help

        Reply
  1. ann
    ann says:

    Ok thank you would i need to get this cerified and how much would it cost to get it done in the uk also whats the shelf life For cold process vs hot process?

    Reply
  2. ann
    ann says:

    And when you say heat both oils do you mean oils (phase b) and water (phase A )? So would the shea butter be in phase b and be at 15% where the vegetable oil is

    Reply
  3. Nia Jenkins
    Nia Jenkins says:

    Hi Jane
    Thank you for the information very interesting
    If the oil phase was increased to 25% by adding 10% cold Shea butter, whipped together to thicken the oil phase would the amount of emulsifier need to be increased please?
    Nia

    Reply

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